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How to Identify the Right Chevy 4L60-E Transmission for Sale..

The Identification Process is best left to a professional who has experience in this matter. My reason for leaving you with this technical information is a way of making a strong impression on why it is so easy to deal with a specialty transmission supplier with the proper identification information and practical usable experience. There is no good reason to complicate the issue.

The Late 4L60-E transmissions had a three piece case of cast aluminum alloy; bell-housing, main case, and tail-housing. GM shortened the package to 21.9″ long – equivalent to a manual transmission of 15.4″.

The input shaft has 30 splines. The transmission typically has pinned flare & o-ring fittings on the passenger side for a cooling circuit. The transmission has a square oil pan.

The key distinction of the Later 4L60-E (1997-2006) from the Early 4L60-E (1992-1997) or 4L60 (1990-1992) or 700R4 (1982-1989) is the six-bolt “hex rear output or tail-housing / adapter pattern. The previous versions featured a four-bolt square bolt pattern at the adapter or tail-housing. Additionally, the removable bell-housing is also another distinguishing feature.

Two-wheel-drive versions have tail-housings and typically a longer output shafts than four-wheel-drive versions, which have various adapter assemblies and a shorter output shaft.

The transmission weighs 146 pounds dry, and 162 wet. It requires 8.4 quarts (9.64″ torque converter) or 11.4 quarts (11.81″ torque converter) of Dexron III fluid, which the factory claims to be a lifetime fill. Deep pan versions require as much as 14 quarts. Length and volume of the cooling circuit will vary and will require an additional amount.

The 4L60-E is found in nearly every GM rear-wheel-drive application, including the C/K Truck, Sonoma, Jimmy, Tahoe, Yukon, Astro, Safari, Suburban, Bravada, Firebird, Camaro and Corvette.

The chart below is a simple description of these Chevy transmissions using both the more common designations on the left and the factory technical designation on the right. I hope you get the idea. If your luck runs out and you need to buy one of our replacement Chevy Transmissions, call GotTransmissions.com @ 866-320-1182.

GM’s alternative designations of these transmissions are:

  • 4L60E = M30
  • 4L65E = M32
  • 4L70E = M70

In fact, the “E” has now been removed, due to the fact that all GM automatics are now electronically controlled and the distinction is no longer useful.

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